Why Aren’t More Parents Signing Children up for Sports Clubs?

Why Aren’t More Parents Signing Children up for Sports Clubs?



Sport, in the United Kingdom especially, is almost everywhere that you look. Whether it is the fallout from the weekend’s football, the pride of watching our athletes win gold or simple grassroots sport you cannot hide from it.

Regardless of whether you like sport yourself or even if you do not come from a particularly sporty family, it is something that every child should have the opportunity to enjoy. Not just because sport makes for great exercise and there is a constant call for parents to get their kids active, rather than spending all day glued to the iPad, but also for its social aspects.

Unlike school, where children see the same faced day in and day out, sports clubs see hundreds of children walk through their doors. It is very likely that children will meet someone new every week, whether they are playing with or against them, depending on the sport and type of club. That can only be a positive, surely?

Role Models

At any good sports club will be a coach or team of coaches that are qualified and CRB-checked in order to work with children. As parents know, children sometimes do not have a good choice in role models, so it is important that we can give them a nudge in the right direction.

Coaches play a pivotal role not just in a child’s on-the-field development, but also off-field, too. Good coaches lead by example, conducting themselves in an appropriate manner in success and disappointment, teaching children how they should handle themselves.

Inclusivity

Sport has the power to bring people together like nothing else does. Families from all backgrounds all have the opportunity to take part, meaning that children from all walks of life integrate and socialise with one and other. With the United Kingdom being a multicultural society, the opportunity to children to make friends with others of all backgrounds is a fantastic prospect.

For children that do not speak English as their first language, sport can be a great outlet for them where they can feel included. Sports such as football, rugby and tennis are a universal language, making it easier for children, or anyone, that may struggle to communicate to engage with others.

It is not unusual for many families to come from countries that rely on charitable programmes where donations are made to sponsor orphans due to volatile conditions. The drastic change can be hard for anyone, especially a young child, and a local sports club can be a welcome release from what is likely to be a stressful period of integration into a new country and way of life.

Release

When children go to school, there is all manner of reasons for stress. This can include homework, exams, social issues, classes and more – without a release, this can cause issues at home and have an effect on the child’s behaviour.

Sometimes, children do not speak to their parents about any problems that they are having at school. This can be down to a lack of confidence or embarrassment – whatever the reason, having a release where normal day-to-day problems can be forgotten about is ideal.

Exercise releases endorphins that project positive vibes, while playing with other children and enjoying some manner of success, whether that be in the form of winning or developing a skill, increases their confidence. This can be transferred into all aspects of your child’s life.


With so many benefits to signing your child up to a sports club, the question is why don’t more parents look to make use of the many clubs that are on their doorstep? Without people signing up, sports clubs wouldn’t be around and that would be a massive loss to the community.
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